Google restricts Huawei from using Android (5G news: 5GWorldPro.com)

Google has barred the world's second biggest smartphone maker, Huawei, from some updates to the Android operating system, dealing a blow to the Chinese company.
New designs of Huawei smartphones are set to lose access to some Google apps.


The move comes after the Trump administration added Huawei to a list of companies that American firms cannot trade with unless they have a licence.
Google said it was "complying with the order and reviewing the implications".
Huawei said it would continue to provide security updates and after sales services to all existing Huawei and Honor smartphone and tablet products covering those have been sold or still in stock globally.
"We will continue to build a safe and sustainable software ecosystem, in order to provide the best experience for all users globally," it added.
In a press briefing, China said it "supports the relevant company [Huawei] to defend its legitimate rights according to law."


What does this mean for Huawei users?


Existing Huawei smartphone users will be able to update apps and push through security fixes, as well as update Google Play services.
But when Google launches the next version of Android later this year, it may not be available on Huawei devices.
Future Huawei devices may no longer have apps such as YouTube and Maps.
Huawei can still use the version of the Android operating system available through an open source licence.
Ben Wood, from the CCS Insight consultancy, said the move by Google would have "big implications for Huawei's consumer business".


What can Huawei do about this?


Last Wednesday, the Trump administration added Huawei to its "entity list", which bans the company from acquiring technology from US firms without government approval.
US chipmakers including Intel, Qualcomm and Broadcom are also reported to have told their workers they will stop supplying Huawei, according to Bloomberg.
Rosenblatt Securities analyst Ryan Koontz said Huawei would be "seriously crippled" if it did not have these "key US components", although the Chinese firm is believed to have stockpiles in place.
In his first comments since the firm was placed on the list, Huawei chief executive Ren Zhengfei told Japanese media on Saturday: "We have already been preparing for this."
He said the firm, which buys about $67bn (£52.6bn) worth of components each year according to the Nikkei business newspaper, would push ahead with developing its own parts.
Huawei faces a growing backlash from Western countries, led by the US, over possible risks posed by using its products in next-generation 5G mobile networks.
Several countries have raised concerns that Huawei equipment could be used by China for surveillance, allegations the company has vehemently denied.
Huawei has said its work does not pose any threats and that it is independent from the Chinese government.
However, some countries have blocked telecoms companies from using Huawei products in 5G mobile networks.
So far the UK has held back from any formal ban.
"Huawei has been working hard on developing its own App Gallery and other software assets in a similar manner to its work on chipset solutions. There is little doubt these efforts are part of its desire to control its own destiny," said Mr Wood.

 

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The objective of this website is to share knowledge and keep track of different topics related to mobile and wireless technology. I am 5G researcher and trainer based in Morocco and middle east I have worked on 5G Radio Access Systems Research and Standardization Group on several topics with various vendors and operators such as Nokia, Huawei, Ericsson, Orange, in research, product management and development roles all over the world.

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